“No Student Left Untested,” by Diane Ravitch

Measuring teacher effectiveness by the performance of students on standardized tests is insane. New York State has just signed on to a particularly dangerous form of this insanity. Diane Ravitch has clearly explained the insanity and its destructive consequences in No Student Left Untested, in the New York Review of Books (hat-tip to Observational Epidemiology). She makes a lot of sense; so much so that the powers that be have singled her out for vicious attacks.

Here is an excerpt (the entire article is highly recommended for anyone interested in the issues; further discussion is here and here):

No high-performing nation in the world evaluates teachers by the test scores of their students; and no state or district in this nation has a successful program of this kind. The State of Tennessee and the city of Dallas have been using some type of test-score based teacher evaluation for twenty years but are not known as educational models. Across the nation, in response to the prompting of Race to the Top, states are struggling to evaluate their teachers by student test scores, but none has figured it out.

All such schemes rely on standardized tests as the ultimate measure of education. This is madness. The tests have some value in measuring basic skills and rote learning, but their overuse distorts education. No standardized test can accurately measure the quality of education. Students can be coached to guess the right answer, but learning this skill does not equate to acquiring facility in complex reasoning and analysis. It is possible to have higher test scores and worse education. The scores tell us nothing about how well students can think, how deeply they understand history or science or literature or philosophy, or how much they love to paint or dance or sing, or how well prepared they are to cast their votes carefully or to be wise jurors.

Of course, teachers should be evaluated. They should be evaluated by experienced principals and peers. No incompetent teacher should be allowed to remain in the classroom. Those who can’t teach and can’t improve should be fired. But the current frenzy of blaming teachers for low scores smacks of a witch-hunt, the search for a scapegoat, someone to blame for a faltering economy, for the growing levels of poverty, for widening income inequality.

Update: Further interesting links are provided by Japheth Wood here.

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About Santo D'Agostino

I have taught mathematics and physics since the mid 1980s. I have also been a textbook writer/editor since then. Currently I am working independently on a number of writing and education projects while teaching physics at my local university. I love math and physics, and love teaching and writing about them. My blog also discusses education, science, environment, etc. https://qedinsight.wordpress.com Further resources, and online tutoring, can be found at my other site http://www.qedinfinity.com
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2 Responses to “No Student Left Untested,” by Diane Ravitch

  1. Whitecorp says:

    I recalled during his term Bush said something similar, like every child shall get tested-nobody likes it, but he doesn’t care lol. Peace.

    • Yes, Diane Ravitch has written extensively on the Bush administration’s “No Child Left Behind” as well. I think you put it well when you say, “…nobody likes it but he doesn’t care.” One of the problems is that we’ve got too many government leaders in education that don’t have any education experience. So they think they know what is wrong with the system and how to fix it, but their experience is in the business world, and educating children is far different from manufacturing widgets. Peace.

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